WordPress Plugins – Change Admin Username

When you install a WordPress site, the system automatically creates an Administrator user account and assigns it a User ID. This is done to allow you to log into the Administration tool to manage your blog installation. Unfortunately you are not allowed to select the User ID that is created. Furthermore you are not allowed to change it once it is created. Normally that would not be a big deal but if you happen to be migrating from an existing blog, you end up with one of two scenarios.

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WordPress Plugins – Bulk Delete

It never fails; no matter how well I plan or no matter how good the migration tool is, there always seems to be some sort of data issue that can best be solved through entry deletion. The problem of course is that in most of these systems deletion is an all or nothing kind of proposition. Rarely do the developers take into consideration that you may only want to delete certain types of entries.

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WordPress Plugins – AJAX Calendar

When I first began blogging I was decidedly against having a calendar appear on the front page. I kept telling myself that I already knew what day it was and I didn’t need a continual reminder of how seldom I posted. It served as a constant feedback mechanism of how pathetic I was as a blogger. When I started this I thought I would write every day. Before long I was happy if I was posting once a week. Then it was maybe twice a month. Without a calendar there I lacked discipline of keeping track of my writing frequency. For the exact reason why I didn’t want a calendar on my blog I realized that was why I needed one.

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WordPress Plugins – Admin Post Navigation

After migrating nearly 2,000 posts from Movable Type to WordPress, I wanted to go through and check a sample of posts to verify that all of the data had transferred correctly. I thought this was going to be a relatively simple task. I went to the WordPress Administration tool and selected Edit under the Posts category. The result was a listing of 15 of the most current posts and a pagination system for the remainder of the posts.

I selected the first post on the list and the system took me to the editor. Within the editor I was able to make whatever changes I wanted to the blog entry and republish the post to update it on the site. I then began searching for a link that would take me to the next post. Oddly, I could not find one.

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WordPress Blogging Software

October 1, 2009
Recently I wrote an entry about changing blog software for the various blogs that I use. I had long been a Movable Type user but decided to change my blogs to use WordPress. In the article I listed several reasons why I made that decision and offered to provide details on how the transition went. Well that was nearly three months ago and I realized that I never went back to the subject. Since I am sure everyone has been on the edge of their seats waiting to hear how it ended I figured I owed it to you to revisit that decision and give you some details on how it went.

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Time for a Blogging Change

After nearly three years of using Movable Type as the engine for my personal blog I have decided to change direction. It is not that I disliked Movable Type or that I found it incapable of doing the job. It just seemed like whenever I needed to change something it took longer for me to do than it really should. Although I am a card-carrying geek that doesn’t mean I want to spend all of my time learning and relearning how to get something done.

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A Freakin’ Nightmare

In my last entry I suggested that there may be a little down time associated with a server/data center move that my hosting service would be doing. The expectation was that the move would occur on Friday evening and that by Sunday I would be back on-line. I felt like an expectant father pacing the floor worrying about my sites and my data. IX Web Hosting was very good at notifying their customers of what to expect and keeping us informed about how things were going. Early Sunday morning I received notification that the server move was completed and was even ahead of schedule. This was awesome! I went out and checked each of my sites and sure enough they seemed to be up and functioning. I left feeling that the worst was behind me. Little did I know that this was just the eye of a very big storm.

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Staking Claim

Driving traffic to a blog whether it be a commercial endeavor or a personal web log such as this can be a full time job. I know some authors are obsessed with the ranking of their blog and the size of their readership. Personally I don’t write to a blog to develop a readership. This is most often just a cheaper alternative to going to therapy. That being said, I am not opposed to people reading my entries. In fact I welcome anyone to read and comment wherever they think appropriate. To help assist me in managing this blog, I have included this site in my Technorati Profile along with my other blogs Diary of a Diehard and 1 Photo 2 Share. I’ve found Technorati to be beneficial and it helps me to maintain what little sanity that I have left.

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This is so wrong

When I first decided to get into the blogsphere the software was still pretty raw and it was pretty hit and miss on whether things would actually work. Slowly but surely the industry began to mature and with it came some stability especially from a software perspective. A couple of years ago I finally decided that it was time for me to give up the manual HTML style of blog that I had been running since 1999 and move into the zeros (2000’s). After reviewing and playing with several different software packages I finally resolved that Movable Type was best suited to what I was going to do. I bought the software. Yes you read that right I actually bought the software. I am probably the only individual on the planet that actually spent money for a license of Movable Type for individual use. I figured that if the developers took the time to create and support the software I should do the same and at least monetarily support them.

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